1A20.10 - Gaussian Probability Curve

Code Number:
1A20.10
Demo Title:
Gaussian Probability Curve
Condition:
Excellent
Principle:
Probabilities
Area of Study:
Mechanics
Equipment:
Acrylic Peg Unit with Bottom Catch Bin Array, Styrofoam Glitter Beads, Pour Unit, and Unit to Empty the Catch Bin.
Procedure:

Set the Gaussian probability curve demonstrator on the table and set the pouring unit into position on the top.  Pour in the small square container of beads at any rate that is desired.  This will be enough beads to make a good probability curve.

Picture three shows the unit needed to pour the beads out of the catch bin.  Take the peg unit off of the base and replace it with the pour unit.  Quickly upend the unit into the plastic container with some shaking until all the beads have been removed.

References:
  • David Kagan, "A Brief Experiment to Illustrate the Relationship Between Statistics and Measurement", TPT, Vol. 27, #1, Jan. 1989, p. 44.
  • Sarah Jacoby, "How To... Survive a Mosh Pit", Popular Science, Vol. 286, #2, Feb. 2014, p. 25.
  • "M-042. Bell Curve Generator", DICK and RAE Physics Demo Notebook, 1993.
  • David Kutliroff, "101. A Duality: Particle-Like Waves or Wave-Like Particles", 101 Classroom Demonstrations and Experiments for Teaching Physics, p. 221 - 223.

Disclaimer: These demonstrations are provided only for illustrative use by persons affiliated with The University of Iowa and only under the direction of a trained instructor or physicist.  The University of Iowa is not responsible for demonstrations performed by those using their own equipment or who choose to use this reference material for their own purpose.  The demonstrations included here are within the public domain and can be found in materials contained in libraries, bookstores, and through electronic sources.  Performing all or any portion of any of these demonstrations, with or without revisions not depicted here entails inherent risks.  These risks include, without limitation, bodily injury (and possibly death), including risks to health that may be temporary or permanent and that may exacerbate a pre-existing medical condition; and property loss or damage.  Anyone performing any part of these demonstrations, even with revisions, knowingly and voluntarily assumes all risks associated with them.