3A95.58 - Stable vs. Chaotic Equilibrium Machine

Code Number:
3A95.58
Demo Title:
Stable vs. Chaotic Equilibrium Machine
Condition:
Excellent
Principle:
Chaos
Area of Study:
Chaos & Probabilities
Equipment:
Chaos Machine, large rubber bands.
Procedure:

See also 3A95.58 in Oscillations/Acoustics.

Put new rubber bands on the chaos machine before operating.  The board has an area drawn on it inside which the machine shows stability.  Chaotic behavior is exhibited by moving outside of the stable region.  Usually a small movement by the rod in the unstable region causes a large change in the stability of the system.

References:
  • Michael Partensky and Peretz D. Partensky, "Can a Spring Beat the Charges?", TPT, Vol. 42, #8, Nov. 2004, p. 472.
  • Richard J. Fitzgerald, "Controlling a Tipping Point", Physics Today, Vol. 67, #9, Sept. 2014, p. 17.
  • Ian Stewart, "Dicing with Death in the Solar System", Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Magazine, p. 57 - 73.
  • Jim Glenn, "Catastrophes and Reality", Scientific Genius: The Twenty Greatest Minds. p. 134 - 135.
  • Stan Gibilisco, "True Order and True Randomness", More Puzzles, Paradoxes and Brain Teasers, p. 82.


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