1Q20.10 - Angular Momentum Machine

Procedure should be self evident from the photos for the large unit on rolling stand.
The PASCO device can be used if it is desired to collect or display data.
Note that data for two equally spaced masses or a single point mass can be displayed with this unit.
The smaller "rod with two masses" unit can be attached to a PASCO or Vernier rotary motion sensor for collection or display of data.
A large version of this demonstration may be shown using the Cenco Apparatus which is set up as depicted in picture # 5.  A stop watch or a photogate may be used to collect the data.
Code Number:
1Q20.10
Demo Title:
Angular Momentum Machine
Condition:
Excellent
Principle:
Moment of Inertia
Area of Study:
Mechanics
Equipment:
Double-mass system on rolling platform, Set of Masses, Inertia App., Rotating Support, PASCO angular momentum apparatus with accessories, PASCO rod with masses system, rotary motion sensor, smart pulleys, photogate.
Procedure:

Procedure should be self evident from the photos for the large unit on rolling stand.  

The PASCO device can be used if it is desired to collect or display data.  Note that data for two equally spaced masses or a single point mass can be displayed with this unit.  

The smaller "rod with two masses" unit can be attached to a PASCO or Vernier rotary motion sensor for collection or display of data.  

A large version of this demonstration may be shown using the Cenco Apparatus which is set up as depicted in picture # 5.  A stop watch or a photogate may be used to collect the data.

References:
  • Eric Hazlett and Andrés Aragoneses, "A 3D-Printed Wheel with Constant Mass and Variable Moment of Inertia for Lab and Demonstration", TPT, Vol. 56, #8, Nov. 2018, p. 535.
  • Peter E. Banks, "An Inexpensive Moment of Inertia Experiment", TPT, Vol. 43, # 6, p. 389, Sept. 2005.
  • Juan F. Carrau, et al., "The Anharmonic Rotating Wheel", TPT, Vol. 43, # 6, p. 349, Sept. 2005.
  • Robert Carr, Harold Cohen, Terry Ragsdale, "Demonstration Angular Momentum Conservation", TPT, Vol. 37, # 3, March 1999, p. 169.
  • Ken Altshuler,  "Inexpensive Rotating - Arm Device for Angular - Motion Labs",  TPT, Vol.  36, # 7, p. 424, Oct. 1998.
  • John Wessner, "The Average Bears Noting", TPT, Vol. 31, # 9, Dec. 1993, p. 548.
  • Brion Patterson,  "Angular Momentum",  TPT, Vol. 27, # 7, p. 566, October 1989.
  • Fred Otto,  "Unlocking the Confusing World of Rotation",  TPT, Vol. 26, # 6, p. 382, Sept. 1988.
  • Alex Fogel, "Building A "No-Cost" Apparatus To Demonstrate Rotational Inertia", TPT, Vol. 22, # 5, May 1984, p. 333.
  • Jimmy J. McCoy,  "Linear Flywheel for Energy Storage",  AJP, Vol. 54, # 9, Sept. 1986.
  • Ms- 7, Mr- 5,  Freier and Anderson,  A Demonstration Handbook for Physics.
  • M- 650,  "Spoked Wheel",  DICK and RAE Physics Demo Notebook.
  • M-166,  Richard Manliffe Sutton, Demonstration Experiments in Physics.
  • Experiment 9 - Moment of Inertia
  • Experiment 8 -Moment of Inertia


Disclaimer: These demonstrations are provided only for illustrative use by persons affiliated with The University of Iowa and only under the direction of a trained instructor or physicist.  The University of Iowa is not responsible for demonstrations performed by those using their own equipment or who choose to use this reference material for their own purpose.  The demonstrations included here are within the public domain and can be found in materials contained in libraries, bookstores, and through electronic sources.  Performing all or any portion of any of these demonstrations, with or without revisions not depicted here entails inherent risks.  These risks include, without limitation, bodily injury (and possibly death), including risks to health that may be temporary or permanent and that may exacerbate a pre-existing medical condition; and property loss or damage.  Anyone performing any part of these demonstrations, even with revisions, knowingly and voluntarily assumes all risks associated with them.