1Q50.20 - Bicycle Wheel - On Stand

The bicycle wheel on the floor stand is hand driven.  Some oiling and adjustment of the bicycle axle may be required. Do not tighten the floor stand to tightly to the shaft of the bicycle wheel as this will prevent the free movement necessary.
It should be noted that the motor is only 12 volts and that we are using a Variac capable of 120 plus volts so that a voltmeter to monitor the voltage may be advisable. The motor driven demonstration also works best with a 100 or 200 gram mass.
The Pasco unit can be used for precision measurements of precession and conservation of angular momentum.
Code Number:
1Q50.20
Demo Title:
Bicycle Wheel - On Stand
Condition:
Good
Principle:
Precession
Area of Study:
Mechanics
Equipment:
Bicycle wheel (mounted on floor stand), Counterweights (2) (500 g, 1 kg), Ships Stabilizer Unit, Pasco Gyroscope Unit.
Procedure:

The bicycle wheel on the floor stand is hand driven.  Some oiling and adjustment of the bicycle axle may be required. Do not tighten the floor stand to tightly to the shaft of the bicycle wheel as this will prevent the free movement necessary.

It should be noted that the motor is only 12 volts and that we are using a Variac capable of 120 plus volts so that a voltmeter to monitor the voltage may be advisable. The motor driven demonstration also works best with a 100 or 200 gram mass.

The Pasco unit can be used for precision measurements of precession and conservation of angular momentum.

References:
  • Philip Davidowsky, Michael Rogers, "Debunking a Video on YouTube as an Authentic Research Experience", TPT, Vol. 53, # 5, May 2015, p. 304.
  • Rod Cross, "Laithwaite's Heavy Spinning Disk Demonstration", TPT, Vol. 52, # 6, Sept. 2014, p. 349.
  • John Cordell, "Correction: John Cordell, "Non-Mathematical Explanation of Precession", TPT, Vol. 50, # 3, Mar. 2012, p. 132.
  • John Cordell, "Non-Mathematical Explanation of Precession", TPT, Vol. 49, # 9, Dec. 2011, p. 572.
  • Svilen Kostov and Daniel Hammer,  "'It Has to Go Down a Little, In Order to Go Around' - Revisiting Feynman on the Gyroscope",  TPT, Vol. 49, # 4, p. 216, April 2011. 
  • George Patrinicola, "Precession of a Bicycle Wheel", TPT, Vol. 21, # 5, May 1983, p. 332.
  • Chris D. Zafirato, "An Alternative Treatment of Gyroscopic Behavior", TPT, Vol. 20, # 1, Jan. 1982, p. 34 - 35.
  • Thomas B. Greenslade, Jr., "Gyroscope  (Photo)", AJP, Vol. 73, # 1, Jan. 2005, p. 39.
  • J. L. Snider, "Gyroscopic Precession", AJP, Vol. 33, # 10, Oct. 1965, p. 847.
  • J. R. Prescott, "Demonstration Gyroscope", AJP, Vol. 31, #5, May 1963, p. 393.
  • Mu- 2,  Freier and Anderson,  A Demonstration Handbook for Physics.
  • M-188,  Richard Manliffe Sutton,  Demonstration Experiments in Physics.
  • R. W. Pohl, "11.  The Precession of the Axis of Momentum", Physical Principles of Mechanics and Acoustics, p. 120.


Disclaimer: These demonstrations are provided only for illustrative use by persons affiliated with The University of Iowa and only under the direction of a trained instructor or physicist.  The University of Iowa is not responsible for demonstrations performed by those using their own equipment or who choose to use this reference material for their own purpose.  The demonstrations included here are within the public domain and can be found in materials contained in libraries, bookstores, and through electronic sources.  Performing all or any portion of any of these demonstrations, with or without revisions not depicted here entails inherent risks.  These risks include, without limitation, bodily injury (and possibly death), including risks to health that may be temporary or permanent and that may exacerbate a pre-existing medical condition; and property loss or damage.  Anyone performing any part of these demonstrations, even with revisions, knowingly and voluntarily assumes all risks associated with them.