1R50.31 - Snow and Ice Crystals

Code Number:
1R50.31
Demo Title:
Snow and Ice Crystals
Condition:
Excellent
Area of Study:
Mechanics
References:
  • Jennifer J. Birriel, "Ice Flower", TPT, Vol. 56, #3, Mar. 2018, p. 192.
  • Bruce J. Ackerson, "Unexpected Patterns in Snow and Dirt", TPT, Vol. 56, #1, Jan. 2018, p.10.
  • Albert A. Bartlett, "Thermal Patterns in the Snow: Icicles as Indicators of Heat Loss", TPT, Vol. 46, #3, Mar. 2008, p. 172. 
  • Gordon McIntosh, "Frost in the Solar System", TPT, Vol. 44, #4, Apr. 2006, p. 226.
  • Kauhiko Hiramatsu and Matthew Sturm, "A Simple, Inexpensive Chamber for Growing Snow Crystals in the Classroom", TPT, Vol. 43, #6, Sept. 2005, p. 346.
  • Donald F. Collins, "Centrifugal Icicles and an Inertial Paradox", TPT, Vol. 42, #2, Feb. 2004, p. 79.
  • Alan J. DeWeerd, "Sun Pillars and Ice Crystals", TPT, Vol. 41, #6, Sept. 2003, p. 318.
  • Dan Quinn, "Photo of the Month", TPT, Vol. 41, #5, May 2003, p. 304.
  • Ron Edge, "Sundogs, Ice Crystals, and Bernoulli", TPT, Vol. 40, #9, Dec. 2002, p. 522.
  • K. P. Trout, "Homemade Ice Spike", TPT, Vol. 39, #3, Mar. 2001, p. 190.
  • Paul Hewitt, "Figuring Physics: Water Molecules in Ice", TPT, Vol. 37, #4, Apr. 1999, p. 243.
  • Helene F. Perry, "A 'Last Word' on Ice Spikes", TPT, Vol. 33, #3, Mar. 1995, p. 148.
  • Walter R. Steiger, "Ice Pillars", TPT, Vol. 32, #3, Mar. 1994, p. 173.
  • Tom Damon, "Vancouver Does It Too!1", TPT, Vol. 31, #6, Sept. 1993, p. 328.
  • Lester Evans, "The Spikes/Whiskers Phenomenon", TPT, Vol. 31, #5, May 1993, p. 264.
  • Helene F. Perry, "Ice Spikes - Can You Explain Them?", TPT, Vol. 31, #2, Feb. 1993, p. 112.
  • James D. White, "The Role of Surface Melting in Ice Skating", TPT, Vol. 30, #8, Nov. 1992, p. 495.
  • Albert A. Bartlett, "Rain, Snow, and Spring Runoff", TPT, Vol. 21, #7, Oct. 1983, p. 462.
  • George W. Ficken, Jr., "Physics at Home - Frost Patterns on Window", TPT, Vol. 19, #1, Jan. 1981, p. 43.
  • David A. Lind, "The Physics of Snow and Avalanche Phenomena", TPT, Vol. 18, #2, Feb. 1980, p. 103.
  • Daisuke Kuroiwa, "A Life of Snow", TPT, Vol. 7, #1, Jan. 1969, p. 13.
  • Mary Jane Shultz, "Crystal Growth in Ice and Snow", Physics Today, Feb. 2018, Vol. 71, #2, p. 34.
  • Steven K. Blau, "How the Bacterium Pseudomonas Syrinage iInduces Water to Crystallize", Physics Today, Vol. 69, #7, July 2016, p. 24.
  • "Hair Ice", Physics Today, Vol. 68, #12, Dec. 2015, p. 96.
  • Richard J. Fitzgerald, "A Study in Contrasts for Inhibiting Surface Frost", Physics Today, Vol. 68, #12, Dec. 2015, p. 25.
  • Richard J. Fitzgerald, "Celebrating Light-Based Science", Physics Today, Vol. 68, #2, Feb. 2015, p. 68.
  • Johanna Miller, "Water Dimer Yields to Spectroscopic Study", Physics Today, Vol. 66, #4, Apr. 2013, p. 18.
  • Richard J. Fitzgerald, "The Many Facets of 'Cubic Ice'", Physics Today, Vol. 66, #2, Feb. 2013, p. 16.
  • Johanna Miller, "Ice Chains on Copper are Built from Pentagons", Physics Today, Vol. 62, #5, May 2009, p. 17.
  • Mark Wilson, "Elementary Excitations in Spin Ice Take the Form of Magnetic Monopoles", Physics Today, Vol. 61, #3, Mar. 2008, p. 16.
  • Yoshinori Furukawa and John S. Wettlaufer, "Snow and Ice Crystals", Physics Today, Vol. 60, #12, Dec. 2007, p. 70.
  • Charles and Naney Knight, "Hailstones", Scientific American, Vol. 224, #4, Apr. 1971, p. 97.
  • Jearl Walker, 'Exotic Patterns Appear in Water When It is Freezing or Melting", The Amateur Scientist, July 1986. 
  • "April 10, 1661: Hooke's Pamphlet on Capillary Action", APS News, April 2013, p. 2.
  • Jearl Walker, "6.57, When the Ice Grows Dark", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 263.
  • Jearl Walker, "6.54, Firnspiegel and Snow Sparkles", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 262.
  • Jearl Walker, "6.53, Colors of Snow and Ice", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 262.
  • Jearl Walker, "6.35, A Sky Full of Halos, Arcs, and Spots", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 255.
  • Jearl Walker, "6.34, The 22º Halo and Sun Dogs", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 136.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.32, Snowflake Formation", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 191.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.22, Figures Inside Melting Ice", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 187.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.21, Cloudy Ice Cubes", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 186.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.20, Ice Spikes and Other Ice Formations", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 185.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.19, Rime Ice and Glaze Ice on Cables", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 168.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.17, Icicles", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 168.
  • Jearl Walker, "4.16, Throwing Hot Water into Very Cold Air", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 184.
  • Jearl Walker, "1.102, Abandoned on the Ice", The Flying Circus of Physics Ed. 2, p. 51.
  • Curt Suplee, "Let's Drink to Water!", Everyday Science Explained, National Geographic, p. 144 - 145.
  • Curt Suplee, "Turning up the Heat", Everyday Science Explained, National Geographic, p. 66 - 67.
  • Julius Sumner Miller, Q23 & A23, Millergrams I – Some Enchanting Questions for Enquiring Minds, p. 26 & 84.
  • Julius Sumner Miller, Q101 & A101, Millergrams I – Some Enchanting Questions for Enquiring Minds, p. 64 & 113.
  • Julius Sumner Miller, Q113 & A113, Millergrams II – Some More Enchanting Questions for Enquiring Minds, p. 11 & 75.
  • Julius Sumner Miller, Q143 & A143, Millergrams II – Some More Enchanting Questions for Enquiring Minds, p. 27 & 86.

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