2C20.40 - Plates and Weights

Turn the air stream on full blast.  Insert the lower plate with the small stem into the hole of the upper plate.  When the plates get close enough together, the lower plate should be suction sealed against the top plate.  At least 300 grams of weight can be applied to the lower plate before it falls off.
Code Number:
2C20.40
Demo Title:
Plates and Weights
Condition:
Good
Principle:
Bernoulli's Principle
Area of Study:
Heat & Fluids
Equipment:
Double metal plate with plastic tube, Masses (set).
Procedure:

Turn the air stream on full blast.  Insert the lower plate with the small stem into the hole of the upper plate.  When the plates get close enough together, the lower plate should be suction sealed against the top plate.  At least 300 grams of weight can be applied to the lower plate before it falls off.

References:
  • Martin Gardner, "Three for Bernoulli", TPT, Vol. 34, # 2, Feb. 1996, p. 79.
  • Chris Waltham, Sarah Bendall, Andrzei Kotlicki, "Bernoulli Levitation", AJP, Vol. 71, # 2, Feb. 2003, p. 176.
  • Fj- 5:  Freier and Anderson,  A Demonstration Handbook for Physics.
  • F- 215:  "Spool and Card - Metal Disks",  DICK and RAE Physics Demo Notebook.
  • M- 295:  Richard Manliffe Sutton, Demonstration Experiments in Physics.
  • George M. Hopkins, "Gases", Experimental Science, p. 101.
  • Martin Gardner, "Three for Bernoulli", Science Tricks, p. 19.
  • Martin Gardner, "Bernoulli's Principle", Entertaining Science Experiments with Everyday Objects, p. 109.
  • Vicki Cobb and Kathy Darling, "No Windfall Here", Bet You Can't!, p. 58.
  • Janice VanCleave, "24, Super Breath", Teaching the Fun of Physics, p. 37.
  • Brown, 333 Science Tricks & Experiments.
  • "Bernoulli Levitator", Exploratorium Science Snackbook, p. 6.1 - 6.2.
  • 3.03:  R. D. Edge, "Bernoulli Effect", String and Sticky Tape Experiments.




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