2C20.50 - Coanda Effect and Angle of Attack - Airplane Wing

Code Number:
2C20.50
Demo Title:
Coanda Effect and Angle of Attack - Airplane Wing
Condition:
Good
Principle:
Bernoulli's Principle
Area of Study:
Heat & Fluids
Equipment:
Pasco cart with attached airplane wing, Plexiglas Stick with a sheet of stiff paper attached (Airplane Wing), Styrofoam airplane, Airhog Airplane.
Procedure:

Hold up the Plexiglas stick and turn it so that the paper curves in an arc.  Blow air across the top with a plastic hose and watch the paper rise into the air flow (Airplane Wing).  Adjust the wing on the Pasco cart so that blowing air across it causes the cart to move to the side.  The model airplanes are used to show curvature of airplane wings for real flying models.

For more complete discussions and information about airfoils, angles of attack, Coanda effect, and common misconceptions visit some of the websites listed in the references.

References:
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