3C20.60 - Increasing Pitch - Euler's Disk, Magnets & Glass Bottles, LIGO Ring Down

Code Number:
3C20.60
Demo Title:
Increasing Pitch - Euler's Disk, Magnets & Glass Bottles, LIGO Ring Down
Condition:
Excellent
Principle:
Frequency of Sound Waves
Area of Study:
Acoustics
Equipment:
Euler's Disk, Smooth Magnets, 1 gallon glass jugs.
Procedure:

The Euler's disk is very easy to use.  Spin the heavy disk ( rounded edge down ) on the slightly concave base.  If you listen carefully, you should hear the pitch of the spinning disk increasing as the disk slows down.

Separate the magnet by a distance of 1 inch in your hand.  Throw them in the air.  They will start bouncing together with a sound that increases in pitch as the bounce distance becomes smaller.

Gently touch the glass jugs together.  They will make a sound that increases in pitch as the bounce distance becomes smaller.

References:
  • W. L. Andersen, "Noncalculus Treatment of Steady-State Rolling of a Thin Disk on a Horizontal Surface", TPT, Vol. 45, #7, Oct. 2007, p. 430.
  • Russell Akridge, "Period and Amplitude", TPT, #8, Vol. 36, Nov. 1998, p. 507.
  • D. Petrie, J. L. Hunt, and C. G. Gray, "Does the Euler Disk Slip During its Motion?", AJP, Vol. 70, #10, Oct. 2002, p. 1025.
  • Lorne A. Whitehead and Frank L. Curzon, "Spinning Objects on Horizontal Planes", AJP, Vol. 51, #5, May 1983, p. 449. 
  • M. G. Calkin, "Adiabatic Invariants for Varying Mass", AJP, Vol. 45, #3, Mar. 1977, p. 301.
  • M. G. Olsson, "Coin Spinning On a Table", AJP, Vol. 40, #10, p. 1543, Oct. 1972.
  • Jearl Walker, "Delights of the "Wobbler," A Coin or a Cylinder that Precesses As It Spins", The Amateur Scientist, Oct. 1982.

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