8A35.20 - Armillary Sphere

Code Number:
8A35.20
Demo Title:
Armillary Sphere
Condition:
Excellent
Principle:
Celestial sphere mechanics
Area of Study:
Astronomy
Equipment:
Armillary Sphere with Accessories.
Procedure:

The Armillary sphere is designed to provide a more simplified explanation of what we observe of the day and night time sky from your position on Earth than what can be provided with the standard celestial sphere.  Tilt of the unit can be adjusted as desired.  The box of accessories should contain any constellation, planets, moon, etc. that you would talk about in a standard astronomy course.  

Go to youtube.com and search "horizon globe pro instructions" for the following 45 short tutorial videos.  You can also find these videos at: 

https://www.horizonglobe.us/pro-support

  • 01 - Initial setup
  • 02 - Day and Night
  • 03 -Directions
  • 04 - Seasons
  • 05 - Seasonal Changes
  • 06 - The Sun's Seasonal Motion
  • 11 - Moon
  • 12 - Moon Motion
  • 13 - Moon & Sun
  • 14 - Moon Phases
  • 15 - Paths of the Full Moon
  • 16 - Paths of Other Phases
  • 17 - Eclipses
  • 21 - Latitude Adjustment
  • 22 - North Pole
  • 23 - Equator
  • 24 - Tropic of Cancer
  • 25 - Arctic Circle
  • 31 - Orion
  • 32 - Big Dipper
  • 33 - Cygnus summer Triangle
  • 34 - Cassiopeia
  • 41 - Taurus
  • 42 - Canis Major
  • 43 - Gemini
  • 44 - Canis Minor
  • 45 - Auriga
  • 51 - Bootes
  • 53 - Virgo
  • 54 - Leo
  • 61 - Scorpius
  • 62 - Sagittarius
  • 71 - Great Sqare
  • 72 - Pisces Austrinus
  • 81 - Aquarius
  • 82 - Pisces
  • 83 - Aries
  • 84 - Cancer
  • 85 - Libra
  • 86 - Capricorn
  • 87 - Zodiac
  • 91 - Little Dipper
  • 92 - Cross Centaur
  • 93 - Ship
  • 94 - Eridanus

 

References:
  • Alejandro Gangul, Roberto Casazza, Carlos Paez, "From the Scale Model of the Sky to the Armillary Sphere", TPT, Vol. 52, #7, Oct. 2014, p. 403. 
  • Anne Lawrence-Mathers, "Medieval Weather Predictions", Physics Today, Vol. 74, #4, April 2021, p. 38. 
  • "The Armillary Sphere", Pike's Illustrated Catalogue of Scientific & Medical Instruments, 1984, p. 107.

Disclaimer: These demonstrations are provided only for illustrative use by persons affiliated with The University of Iowa and only under the direction of a trained instructor or physicist.  The University of Iowa is not responsible for demonstrations performed by those using their own equipment or who choose to use this reference material for their own purpose.  The demonstrations included here are within the public domain and can be found in materials contained in libraries, bookstores, and through electronic sources.  Performing all or any portion of any of these demonstrations, with or without revisions not depicted here entails inherent risks.  These risks include, without limitation, bodily injury (and possibly death), including risks to health that may be temporary or permanent and that may exacerbate a pre-existing medical condition; and property loss or damage.  Anyone performing any part of these demonstrations, even with revisions, knowingly and voluntarily assumes all risks associated with them.