8D30.50 - Satellites

Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Space Flight Experiments Designed and Built at The University of Iowa, Department of Physics and Astronomy (1951 - 2010)
Code Number:
8D30.50
Demo Title:
Satellites
Condition:
Excellent
Equipment:
Actual Spacecraft, Prototypes, and Instrument Packages.
Procedure:

The University of Iowa has a long history in space exploration starting with James A. Van Allen.  Actual spacecraft and instrument packages built here at the University are available for classroom demonstrations.

References:
  • Eugene Edward Nalence, "Investigating Satellites", TPT, Vol. 60, #8, Nov. 2022, p. 648.
  • Paul Hewitt, "Figuring Physics", TPT, Vol. 60, #5, May 2022, p. 384.
  • Julien Vandermarlière, "Determination of the Orbital Inclination of the ISS with a Smartphone", TPT, Vol. 57, #7, Oct. 2019, p. 502.
  • D. A. Smith and D. C. Hill, "Imaging Artificial Satellites: An Observational Challenge", TPT, Vol. 54, #7, Oct. 2016, p. 444.
  • Paul Hewitt, "Figuring Physics: Earth Satellites", TPT, Vol. 51, #4, Apr. 2013, p. 202.
  • Carl E. Mungan, "Relativistic Effects on Clocks Aboard GPS Satellites", TPT, Vol. 44, #7, Oct. 2006, p. 424.
  • D. J. Knipp, E. T. Patterson, A. Franz, J. H. Head, T. A. Summers, and E. L. Zirbel, "Simulating Realistic Satellite Orbits in the Undergraduate Classroom", TPT, Vol. 43, #8, Oct. 2005, p. 452.
  • Volker Thomsen, "Signals from Communications Satellites", TPT, Vol. 34, #4, Apr. 1996, p. 218.
  • Albert A. Bartlett, "The Velocity of an Orbiting Satellite", TPT, Vol. 23, #1, Jan. 1985, p. 29.
  • Robert E. Chesley, "Determination of Satellite Orbit By Measurement of Doppler Effect", TPT, Vol. 2, #2, Feb. 1964, p. 70.
  • Gerald E. Hite and James E. McCoy, "The Electrodynamic Tether", AJP, Vol. 56, #3, Mar. 1988, p. 222.
  • R. D. Edge, "Distinction Between Center of Mass and Center of Gravity - Oscillation of Rod-Shaped Satellite as an Example", AJP, Vol. 53, #10, Oct. 1985, p. 1002.
  • Toni Feder, "Ballooning Satellite Populations in Low Earth Orbit Portend Changes for Science and Society", Physics Today, Vol. 75, #4, April 2022, p. 25.
  • "Probing Atmospheric Reentry", Physics Today, Vol. 69, #1, Jan. 2016, p. 72.
  • Toni Feder, "Imaging Earth Daily to Help Humanity", Physics Today, Vol. 67, #11, Nov. 2014, p. 27.
  • Clay Dillow, "China's Race to Space Domination", Popular Science, Vol. 288, #5, Sept/Oct. 2016, p. 64.
  • Wallace A. Hilton, "Experiment I-16", Experiments in Optical Physics, p. 41.
  • Mark Williamson, "Smallsat Revolution", Ad Astra, Vol. 27, #2, Summer 2015, p. 34.
  • Bathroom Readers' Institute, "Space Travelers", Uncle John's Bathroom Reader for Kids - Did You Know?, p. 201.
  • "Space Junk", Uncle John's Bathroom Reader, p. 316.
  • Jenna Hammerich, "Stellar Collaboration: Figgie Art Museum Partners with UI Department of Physics and Astronomy on Exhibit", Iowa Now, July 11, 2012.

Disclaimer: These demonstrations are provided only for illustrative use by persons affiliated with The University of Iowa and only under the direction of a trained instructor or physicist.  The University of Iowa is not responsible for demonstrations performed by those using their own equipment or who choose to use this reference material for their own purpose.  The demonstrations included here are within the public domain and can be found in materials contained in libraries, bookstores, and through electronic sources.  Performing all or any portion of any of these demonstrations, with or without revisions not depicted here entails inherent risks.  These risks include, without limitation, bodily injury (and possibly death), including risks to health that may be temporary or permanent and that may exacerbate a pre-existing medical condition; and property loss or damage.  Anyone performing any part of these demonstrations, even with revisions, knowingly and voluntarily assumes all risks associated with them.