1K20.10 - Friction Blocks

Code Number:
1K20.10
Demo Title:
Friction Blocks
Condition:
Good
Principle:
Components of Forces
Area of Study:
Mechanics
Equipment:
Friction Blocks, Newton Scales, 1 and 2 kg Slotted Weights, and Modeling Clay.
Procedure:

1 and 2 kg slotted weights may be put on the friction blocks that have the pegs sticking out of the middle.

The metal block is used on the masonite surface to show that the friction does not depend on surface area for the same object.  Use the flat wide side or the narrow side of the block to show the same frictional value.

References:
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